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Neural regulation of alveolar bone remodeling and periodontal ligament metabolism during orthodontic tooth movement in response to therapeutic loading

  • Author Footnotes
    † These authors have contributed equally to this work.
    Mingjin Zhang
    Footnotes
    † These authors have contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    † These authors have contributed equally to this work.
    Yi Yu
    Footnotes
    † These authors have contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Danqing He
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors at: Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School & Hospital of Stomatology, #22 Zhongguancun South Avenue, Beijing, 100081, China.
    Affiliations
    Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Dawei Liu
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors at: Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School & Hospital of Stomatology, #22 Zhongguancun South Avenue, Beijing, 100081, China.
    Affiliations
    Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Yanheng Zhou
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors at: Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School & Hospital of Stomatology, #22 Zhongguancun South Avenue, Beijing, 100081, China.
    Affiliations
    Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, Beijing, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    † These authors have contributed equally to this work.
Published:September 26, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejwf.2022.08.003

      Highlights

      • Nervous system participates in the orthodontic tooth movement process and regulating bone remodeling as well as periodontal ligament metabolism via different pathways.
      • Sensory neural markers, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P, are involved in the neurovascular reaction to orthodontic forces in the periodontium.
      • Sympathetic nervous system can enhance tooth movement by upregulating the expression of various receptors and pathways promoting osteoclastogenesis.
      • Leptin can not only modulate the inflammatory response of immune cells to mechanical force but also have a significant impact on periodontal ligament cell apoptosis during orthodontic tooth movement.

      ABSTRACT

      With increased understanding of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in recent years, neural regulation of OTM has become an emerging and expanding area of research. Numerous studies have shown that the nervous system, including the central and peripheral systems, regulates bone remodeling through various neuropeptides, receptor expression, etc. OTM is a unique periodontal tissue remodeling process induced by mechanical force, including changes in the periodontal ligament metabolism and alveolar bone remodeling. Various studies have shown that the nervous system participates in the OTM process and regulates the periodontal ligament metabolism. This review summarizes the current researches on neural regulation of bone remodeling and the biological responses within the periodontal ligamentduring OTM under therapeutic loading. We also discuss the issues that remain to be addressed in this field. The exploration of neural regulation on OTM not only assists us to understand the mechanism of OTM more thoroughly, but also provides a new insight to accelerate tooth movement in the future.

      Keywords

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